A Travellerspoint blog

In Northern 'Nam

Our emails from Thammasat always seemed to happen in this fashion: We'd be having one of the most amazing days, and one person casually stops by a computer to check their email. As dorky as it sounds, we were always checking in hopes of receiving a confirmation letter that school was about to start back up again after our hiatus. From all we'd been hearing in the news and from the daily "Urgent: Flood Notice" emails that the government sent out (which, ironically, absolutely flooded my inbox), we had no reason to assume otherwise. This one special day however, we were sitting around the dinner table at our friend Brian's dad's place, and one person had mail informing that school was cancelled for one more week, racking the total up to three weeks!
The least fun part about travels during this time were our constant return-flight tickets, meaning that no matter what, we had to keep returning to the land of the floods in-between each adventure. I even tried to play around with the Kuwait Airways website, seeing if I could simply change the destination of my ticket! But considering that is one of the tiniest airlines around, my options were limited to the actual country of Kuwait, Paris, and New York...not really practical for a SE Asian traveler.
I ended up flying back with half of the crew, and we figured that because we had not received word that our places were actually uninhabitable, as long as we could get home we would sit down with our laptops and figure out travel plans from Bangkok! Vietnam was always on the radar, but I never imagined how spur-of-the-moment that decision would have been made. I went to sleep that first night to a dry Bangkok outside of my apartment, and woke up in the early morn to water creeping up the curb across the street from my place. From there on out, my existence seemed to be dedicated to trying to book myself on a flight out that day. My friends at the apartment down the road had to trek through waist-high water to vacate their places at this point, and I did not want to wait until it got to that point! A slough of price checking, credit card declining, and parental Skyping ensued for the entire day until I had finally succeeded in getting myself a spot on a Vietnam Airlines flight to Hanoi the next morning. We called one of the few taxis left in the area and made it to the airpot on time, and so very thankful to have the means to actually leave during the flood.

My street on October 26th, just on the other side of the median than where my apartment building is located.

My street on October 26th, just on the other side of the median than where my apartment building is located.

Water taking over the bus station I generally use.

Water taking over the bus station I generally use.

In Hanoi, we had a silent pact to not talk about the floods back home, ate bowls and bowls of fresh pho, and basked in the glory of bread, wine, and cheese all around the city! The French influence on Vietnam is so easily seen--in the architecture, cobblestone roads, and certainly food. I was traveling with my friend Mathilde, who is an exchange student from Paris, and even pointed out a building that reminded her of her apartment back in France!

A millionaire in Vietnam! Their currency was at about 20,000 Dong to the Dollar

A millionaire in Vietnam! Their currency was at about 20,000 Dong to the Dollar

Living on a strict diet of pho and baguettes mmmmm

Living on a strict diet of pho and baguettes mmmmm

Vietnamese traffic is killer. If only you could hear the insane horn-honking that is going on here as well.

Vietnamese traffic is killer. If only you could hear the insane horn-honking that is going on here as well.

An afternoon at the Hanoi Hilton, the prison-turned-museum where John McCain spent time as a POW

An afternoon at the Hanoi Hilton, the prison-turned-museum where John McCain spent time as a POW

We were without a Vietnam Lonely Planet or much other information about the place, so thought it best to book a few tours during our stay. The first of our trips consisted of a night train to the north and card/bonding games all along the way! That 2-day trek and home-stay in the H'mong village of Sapa that followed has got to be the greatest investment I've ever made. We hiked through mud and across streams, while taking in the beautiful view of rice terraces all the while. And oh boy, that dinner we all helped cook at the home-stay's kitchen was the greatest food I ate in 'Nam. There were spring rolls and stir fries galore!

Rice terraces surrounding us during our hike in Sapa, near the border of Vietnam and China

Rice terraces surrounding us during our hike in Sapa, near the border of Vietnam and China

Our Vietnamese crew with Sue, our Sapa guide, along the hike!

Our Vietnamese crew with Sue, our Sapa guide, along the hike!

Cooking a dinner for 20 people in the home-stay's one wok in Sapa

Cooking a dinner for 20 people in the home-stay's one wok in Sapa

Stopping to take in the view along the trails--this stop was right in front of a beautiful waterfall

Stopping to take in the view along the trails--this stop was right in front of a beautiful waterfall

Next up was a 2-night stay in Halong Bay filled with beach time, Halloween night on a boat, cave exploring, and kayaking!

Laying out on the deck of the boat in Halong Bay

Laying out on the deck of the boat in Halong Bay

Exploring the oceanside hills of Cat Ba Island in Halong Bay after a group hike

Exploring the oceanside hills of Cat Ba Island in Halong Bay after a group hike

On the back of a bike in Nihn Bihn! We all switched off driving until all of us had driven a motorcycle in Asia

On the back of a bike in Nihn Bihn! We all switched off driving until all of us had driven a motorcycle in Asia

After climbing up to what we dubbed "The Great Wall of Vietnam." What a viewpoint!

After climbing up to what we dubbed "The Great Wall of Vietnam." What a viewpoint!

Our time in Northern Vietnam was especially wonderful because the our group had not known each other insanely well before the traveling. There were 5 Americans, 1 Frenchie, and a Swede, and we had so much fun learning each other's languages (as best we could, at least) and getting to know even more tourists that just happened to be on the same sorts of transportation as us. And although I cannot find a way to upload it right now, we made the coolest of videos--of us dancing through Vietnam!

Don't let this minimally-described journey fool you here, I had more than a blast in the beautiful country of Vietnam. It just happens to be that right now, I am back in that Poli Sci library on campus, have just cranked out a 6-pager for my 24-hour Art and Architecture final, and am using writing to you all as wonderful procrastination until I finish a 10-pager, 15-pager, and study for an in-class exam that's held at 1pm tomorrow! Thammasat sure is keeping their promise of having us thoroughly catch up on the classes that we've missed during the past two months. We figured out that one while in Chiang Mai, the second to last of my travels before finally returning to Bangkok, but that one will have to wait a little longer. I'm off to turn in this paper and my completed sketchbook for once and for all!

Posted by jenfeen 23:31 Archived in Vietnam Comments (1)

All about the Philippines!

After the longest hiatus in the history of, well, this blog because I've never written another one, I am happy to announce that I am writing from my university in Bangkok! For the first time in two months, I have stopped to breathe. The operative word for the past two months is definitely "chaotic," and because of that, I am going to try my damnedest to recap my experiences to the best of my abilities!

I departed Bangkok on October 14th, 2011--when we were informed by TU that the school would be closed for two weeks due to minor concerns of flooding. I truly believed that the waters would be kept under control, just as I'm sure my university and government here in Thailand did, and thus I booked a round-trip ticket to Manila and back. Before I finish the story of how awful round-trip tickets turned out to be these past months, the Philippines most certainly deserves me breaking here to rave about the country!
We stayed with my friend Brian's family in Manila, and spent our days living his Filipino life. That is, we honestly did whatever his parents suggested to get a good feel of the place. Now, you'll see pretty soon that I really really loved the Philippines, but I think that love had a whole lot to do with the people I was with and not 100% because of the city of Manila. You see, Manila is highly Westernized which was such a shock for me to see after living so long on the outskirts of Bangkok. Yes, I do live in a city, but I rarely visit the business district in the center and it in no way is progressing at as fast a pace as Manila! The thing that struck me most about Manila was it's commitment to glamour--malls were everywhere, and considered high class, and the streets were lined with neon lights and rhinestone signs. But the thing that struck me most about Manila was that almost everyone we met understood and spoke English! Man, was that a surprise after the days of playing charades with street vendors in Bangkok to order some lunch.
Because of the intense reverse culture shock of landing in Manila, I have got to say that my favorite moments in the city were when we ventured out to visit the slums. The community we visited lived right at the base of a dump site, but you'd never know it by the smiles on each of their faces. Every mom, child, and neighbor was excited to tell us stories of their families and daily routine, and we could not get enough of it! This experience was especially rich because even in Thailand where poverty is definitely seen, it's rare to hear stories of the people it's affected because of the language barrier.
We only spent the first few days in Manila, and no matter how strange it seemed to see a city of this caliber, I am so happy for the time we had there. The people are extraordinary and, yes, I finally did get my Taco Bell.

Walking up to the neighborhood

Walking up to the neighborhood


Backflips right over that trash!

Backflips right over that trash!


Beautiful girls from the slum we visited

Beautiful girls from the slum we visited


Crunchwrap Supremes have never tasted so good!

Crunchwrap Supremes have never tasted so good!

Next up was beautiful Boracay, an island of the Philippines. And when I say beautiful, I mean it with every ounce of wonder that has ever been squeezed out of that word. Someone told me that Boracay ranked #2 on the list of most breathtaking beaches in the world right after one in the Dominican Republic, but I'd like to help contest its spot for numero uno. We relaxed, snorkled, bonded like crazy, and had the best island getaway one could imagine! I'll let the photos do all the talking...

In a "trike" on the way to our hostel

In a "trike" on the way to our hostel


What we were welcomed with at 6:00 in the morning. Folks, there was no Photoshopping here.

What we were welcomed with at 6:00 in the morning. Folks, there was no Photoshopping here.

Fire dancers doing their thing at night

Fire dancers doing their thing at night


Snorkeling stop during a motorboat tour of the islands

Snorkeling stop during a motorboat tour of the islands


Sunset on Boracay Beach

Sunset on Boracay Beach

Back in Manila for a few days, we visited the Old Spanish quarters and learned tons about the history of the Spanish around those parts, and were off to visit a dormant volcano as well!

Walking through Intramuros, the old Spanish area

Walking through Intramuros, the old Spanish area


Naturally, had to pose with one of their guards because of how awesome his hat was

Naturally, had to pose with one of their guards because of how awesome his hat was

It was about this time that we check our email again, greeted with one not-so-lovely update that our cancellations from school were to be extended for two more weeks. That's a story you've got to hear, but because the sun's going down in Bangkok and this Poli Sci library is too A/C-ed out for me to handle anymore, I'll write on how my trip to Vietnam came to be a little later! Get ready for the insanity that will surely follow.

Posted by jenfeen 02:03 Archived in Philippines Comments (0)

Thailand under water

storm 80 °F

The floods around Thailand have been making headlines here for weeks, but it wasn't until a few days ago that I really understood the insanity that is going on. I received an email from my UC EAP program advisor one week ago warning about travel to the Northern Provinces and staying in constant contact with our parents until this passes. Four days ago, he warned us that the grocery stores are sold out of instant noodles from families preparing for the worst. And two days ago, we were informed by Thammasat that school would be cancelled for two weeks because of the flood.

The area around my place is still, but the walk to school is just crazy! We're located right next to the Chao Phraya River, and from standing on the bridge and looking down, it is easy to see that the water level has risen immensely. I'm right in the capital, so the city has excellent irrigation--flooding of my street or apartment building probably won't happen, but people are preparing for every possible circumstance. The lobby of my apartment has moved all of its couches to the 5th floor, and the elevators now have cinderblocks cemented around the front in case water pours in. Even the 7-11s have sandbagged the entrances to protect their store. I have a few friends who live north of Bangkok, and although their houses have not been affected yet, they are insanely close to the flood zones! We'll all be thinking good thoughts for them, and hope that their houses and families stay nice and dry over the next week or so.

Well, since the floods are supposed to hit Bangkok the hardest October 16th-18th and school is out until the 24th, we're trying to make the best of the situation, be safe, and use this time to travel away from the city! I've just booked at round-trip flight to Manila in The Philippines, and I leave Friday morning! Our group is about 7 people, and our friend Brian has been sweet enough to ask if we can stay with his family when we touch down in The Philippines. His aunt may even be our tour guide for the entire trip! The southern parts of The Philippines have been the only areas really affected by the storm, so we're staying up north, visiting some of the most pristine beaches in Asia (Boracay, for starters!), and absolutely going with the flow for this vacation. We booked our tickets on a whim and want to keep the feel of our entire trip the same way! I do have one thing on my to-do list this trip though: TACO BELL. I have been without good Mexican food for months now and I am about to eat so many Crunchwrap Supremes. And yes, for the record, I am apparently now referring to Taco Bell as "good Mexican food." I have a serious problem.

So as of now, I am safe and sound and am leaving Thailand when the storm will hit hardest. Be back in BKK October 24th just in time for classes to start up again! Here's an article about the flooding if you'd like to read up on the current situation:

I'll be sure to update upon my return! All my love to Thailand during this crazy time, and please send some of yours this way as well!

Posted by jenfeen 19:58 Archived in Thailand Tagged flood Comments (0)

Left my heart in Kanchanaburi

Kanchanaburi and Erawan Falls

semi-overcast 80 °F
View Flying into Asia on jenfeen's travel map.

Made it back on Tuesday from a home-run trip to Kanchanaburi! This province is a 2-hour bus ride from Bangkok and easily jumped its way up the list to being my FAVORITE spot in Thailand. I drove a motorcycle, swam in a waterfall, and witnessed the most breathtaking sunset. One night in Kanchanaburi and anyone would be hooked. And I spent two nights.
We've been talking about visiting Kanchanaburi for weeks because it's so conveniently close, but lovely Bangkok just kept sucking us in with its charm weekend after weekend! But after having too many talks about our semester moving so very fast, we had to be more proactive about these trips. So, we decided Friday night that we wanted to go, and were on one of the first buses out of Bangkok Saturday morning! Love that easy as pie Thai travel.

My friend Lex and I arrived earlier than the rest of our group, and got started on the historical stuff right away. Kanchanaburi is the scene of the Death Railway--the railroad that was forcibly built by POWs of the Japanese in 1942. The tracks were purposed as an easy-transport route for Japanese supplies between Burma and Thailand, and contracted the work of over 200,000 men during WWII. The JEATH War Museum just around the corner from our guesthouse was filled with amazing exhibits about the prisoners and their struggles, and had even greater representations of the death tolls of the Asian, European, and Australian laborers. We even watched a short movie about the Bridge over the River Kwai, and I feel so much more educated about the event now. Plus, the museum offered free coffee and tea to each visitor which made me even more fond of this place.

Riding in style in Thailand

Riding in style in Thailand


The cemetery grounds

The cemetery grounds

Back at the guesthouse, we met up a group of our international friends who had left Bangkok the day before, and chatted about life and the national park they had just visited while the sun went down over the river. After being in Bangkok for extended periods of time, there is nothing better than watching the sunset with crystal clear skies. Gorgeous, just gorgeous! Oh, and the steak that the hotel served up for me while watching that sunset was delicious, just delicious!

Sunset in Kanchanaburi

Sunset in Kanchanaburi

The next morning we woke up early to get a good start on our adventure for the day--making the trip to Erawan National Park to see some waterfalls! It had rained that night and drizzled that morning, so we had a bit of a dilemma. We could either make the 1-hour trip in a bus to stay dry, or we could do the more fun (and potentially more stupid) thing and rent motorcycles! Yup, barely even discussed doing the former.
Our group was 2 boys and 4 girls, and the boys chivalrously offered to drive 2 bikes with 2 girls riding on the back. That left one more pair of girls that needed a ride, so I volunteered in a heartbeat! I had never driven a motorcycle before nor had I driven period in Thailand, so things were about to get interesting. And after test driving around the streets in front of the guesthouse and finally remembering that people drive on the left side of the road here...Lex hopped on the back and we were off! I'm sure she was frightened out of her mind to ride with a rookie, but she was a champ and threw a smile on instead! That 1-hour drive from Kanchanaburi to Erawan was breathtakingly beautiful, and I'm thoroughly convinced that it'd be a crime to take it on any vehicle that does not completely expose you to the elements. We passed flowery trees and bridges over rivers, and the scents whipping you right in the face on those motorcycles were key! The drive started out slow and steady, but once I got the hang of the bike and felt more in control, we were passing trucks and zooming around curves like bosses!

It's been raining profusely all around Thailand for weeks, so the park warned us on arrival that we were to be extraordinarily careful hiking up the muddy hills, and that we were not to swim in the falls. Little did they know, our group does not follow direction well. We booked it the path to the first waterfall, stopped for a monkey sighting, trekked to the second, and continued in this fashion all the way to the sixth tier of falls! By this point, it was around 3:00 in the afternoon and since the park closed at 4:00 (apparently a rule they really would enforce) we made an executive decision to not hike to the seventh and last fall, and swim right there in the sixth instead. The waters, although tan from the mud run-off, were so refreshing after the hike! We waded in a quickly realized that in order to avoid the fish that nibbled at us--they were the same kind that you find at Fish Spas all throughout Asia, only much bigger!--we had to keep moving. The flailing around part wasn't too hard considering that swimming upstream to the actual waterfall was like swimming on a tredmil; it was the getting anywhere that proved to be the problem!

At the 6th of 7 falls

At the 6th of 7 falls


Taking a dip in the falls!

Taking a dip in the falls!

We splashed around for some time until we felt the rain start up and knew it was time to head back. Being professional Thais at this point though, we all whipped ponchos out of our backpacks and threw them on in no time for the hike back! Luckily the rain let up by the time we reached the motorcycle parking, and the ride back to Kanchanaburi was just as lovely as the ride there.

Stretching out mid-ride home

Stretching out mid-ride home


Riding home with the sun on our backs

Riding home with the sun on our backs

Lex and I stayed one night longer than the rest of the group, and had the greatest time singing along to The Eagles at a bar called Blue Jeans, playing some Jenga, and hearing stories from a Thai bartender at a place called Sugar Member. And of course, the night ended with us stopping by 7-11 on the walk home because, well, I can't think of a day in Thailand in which I have not visited one of the thousands of Sewens (the proper way to refer to 7-11s in Thai) at least three times.

Every day I have these "falling in love with Thailand" moments, and they happened at least a dozen times a day in Kanchanaburi. The history, the nature, and the people are amazing and I cannot wait to make it back! Next time, when the waters at Erawan are crystal-clear so that I can see those fish coming up to nibble at me!

Posted by jenfeen 18:37 Archived in Thailand Tagged kanchanaburi Comments (0)

Bangkok livin'

sunny 85 °F

I know that I haven't written in weeks, but I promise that I'm alive! I could spill all these excuses on you about midterms and lack of internet, blah, blah, blah, but if I've learned anything from years of filling my brain up with movie quotes instead of schoolwork, it's Rule #76: No excuses, play like a champion (courtesy of Vince Vaughn in Wedding Crashers). I haven't had any huge excursions since Cambodia, but I've been up to a whole lot of little things! Here's the breakdown and (better yet!) tons of photos so that you can see for yourself!

Teaching English
I cannot believe that throughout this entire travel journal, I haven't written about the most exciting thing I've done here in Thailand--teaching English! My UC EAP advisor has some amazing connections with internships and volunteer work. I let him know about my intentions to pursue an Education minor at UCSB, and he reached right in that magic bag of resources of his and pulled out an opportunity for me to teach at an elementary school! The school is an hour away by shuttle van, but I've got two program pals to make the journey with, and those kids sure make it worth it once we're there. I started my first day teaching a 6th grade, 4th grade, and kindergarten class, and had absolutely no idea what I was doing, to be completely honest. The teachers are so sweet and have so much faith in us that they literally walk us to a classroom and set us free! The first few minutes entail flipping through the kids' English language books to see what level of speaking and writing they are at, and then we get going with writing phrases on the board and teaching English songs to the classes. I've been to the campus 3 times so far, lately have been split into different classrooms from my fellow volunteers and teaching alone! The 7th graders understand a lot of what I say in English, and they're currently learning about American superheroes which, for anyone who knows me, is definitely my forte. They read aloud stories about the Hulk and X-Men while I help with pronunciation and they help my Thai in return! The kindergarten classes are a little tougher to work with because they've only got the alphabet and counting down, but man do they love to sing "The Wheels on the Bus" and "Jingle Bells." Even though it's only once a week, these kids are so much fun that they keep me going from Monday through Friday!
Attempting to teach kindergartners at the end of their 7-hour school day

Attempting to teach kindergartners at the end of their 7-hour school day


Finishing up a solid day with a group photo! When the teachers are around, they have their cameras glued to their hands, ready to catch every cute moment on film.

Finishing up a solid day with a group photo! When the teachers are around, they have their cameras glued to their hands, ready to catch every cute moment on film.

Muay Thai
Thailand has a scarcity of gyms and it is far too hot/humid to be running outside, so a few friends and I found a creative answer to staying in shape--Thai kickboxing. I've got gear (bright blue Muay Thai shorts, hand wrapping, gloves, and ankle guards) and a lifetime membership to the Muay Thai club on campus and I try to work out there twice a week! After suiting up, there's a list of 10 or 11 mandatory warm up activities to complete; everything from resting your leg on the wall and doing these twist-kick maneuvers to 40 squats on your tip toes. The warm up itself always has me breaking a sweat! Then it's on to training with the owner of the club. He's around 60 years old, has countless boxing medals, and follows a teaching style that can only be compared to that of the Karate Kid. It's wax on, wax off his way or the highway. I've got to side kick him, punch, punch, upper-cut, punch, and kick him away just to start off the work out. It's killer! I do combos like that for almost an hour straight while simultaneously completing this really cool magic trick where my shirt changes colors from the sweat. It's easily the most fun way to stay in shape! I have yet to make it to a professional Muay Thai match, but maybe when I do go I'll recognize a few of the combos they throw out!
My battle wound from elbow punches at Muay Thai. No pain, no gain!

My battle wound from elbow punches at Muay Thai. No pain, no gain!

Exploring the Grand Palace
Thammasat organizes some pretty cool field trips through the Thai Studies department, and one of my favorites has been my Society and Culture class's guided tour of the Grand Palace. You can see the golden spires of the Grand Palace from my classroom windows, and they've been taunting me for weeks about living in Thailand and never actually stepping foot inside! I'm glad I waited to see the place though, because our tour was pretty darn exclusive. We got in for free because of our uniforms, and were allowed to walk around the inside of the King's living quarters at the palace. The current King Rama IX doesn't live on the grounds now, but all the other King Ramas before him walked around and held meetings on the carpets we were walking on! The palace grounds look uncannily like Disneyland to me--it's insanely clean, the lawns are perfectly manicured, and the architecture is very Western. One court is even modeled after the Buckingham Palace! Our guide took us all around the grounds with the other tourists until we reached a closed gate and were given strict instructions of how to enter and wai (bow) at the next building we were about to enter. The Princess had passed away a few weeks back, and we were actually permitted to enter the room where her body is preserved to pay our respects. We removed our shoes, wai-ed three times to Buddha, once to the Princess, and sat for a moment while monks sang these beautiful songs in the background. Her body will stay there for 100 days until the proper Buddhist rituals can be completed, so being able to see this was quite the exclusive gig. Now that I know we can slide right into the palace for free as long as we're dressed in the Thammasat uniform, I'll certainly be going back to explore more!
Previous Kings' living quarters. Inside there were gigantic chandeliers and huge lacquered murals!

Previous Kings' living quarters. Inside there were gigantic chandeliers and huge lacquered murals!


After spending a good 5 minutes trying to make the guy laugh. He was not amused.

After spending a good 5 minutes trying to make the guy laugh. He was not amused.


A model of Angkor Wat, Cambodia--where I just visited! The King was in so much awe by Angkor Wat that he ordered the temple to be picked up and moved to Bangkok. Well, that obviously wasn't going to work out too well so his guys got away with constructing a mini model of the temple and placing it within the Palace walls instead.

A model of Angkor Wat, Cambodia--where I just visited! The King was in so much awe by Angkor Wat that he ordered the temple to be picked up and moved to Bangkok. Well, that obviously wasn't going to work out too well so his guys got away with constructing a mini model of the temple and placing it within the Palace walls instead.

Ayutthaya
Another excellent field trip through Thammasat was our recent trip to explore Ayutthaya, Thailand's first capital city. Ayutthaya was sacked by the Burmese in the 1700s, and they really did take everything. The ruins still stand, but they're only stone structures now. The prangs used to be covered in gold and jewels, but the Burmese set the buildings on fire during their raid in order to remove anything valuable and take away to their capital. They even severed and stole heads from many of the stone Buddha images to sell on the black market. Apparently you can buy these bad boys in New York City these days! We hit Wat Chai Wattanaram as the sun was going down, and the lighting made the structure absolutely gorgeous. Such a long field trip, but it was with great company and I learned a ton about Thai history! And then, in typical Thai fashion of course, our charter bus got stuck on some power lines and the driver climbed out the window and up to the roof to detangle them. Oh, Thailand...you never cease to amaze me.
A seated Buddha image at Wat Mahathat

A seated Buddha image at Wat Mahathat


One of the severed Buddha heads reclaimed by a tree at the exit of the Wat

One of the severed Buddha heads reclaimed by a tree at the exit of the Wat


Lunch break at the Ayutthaya floating market

Lunch break at the Ayutthaya floating market


We stopped by an elephant show and he could pop balloons by throwing a dart with his trunk!

We stopped by an elephant show and he could pop balloons by throwing a dart with his trunk!


One of the three chedis of Wat Sri Sanphet

One of the three chedis of Wat Sri Sanphet


Wat Chai Wattanaram as the sun set

Wat Chai Wattanaram as the sun set


These structures were HUGE! Perfect grounds for a good game of hide and seek.

These structures were HUGE! Perfect grounds for a good game of hide and seek.

Midterms have been taking over my week, but I'm thinking that a nice trip to Erawan Falls this weekend is in order for a little celebration! Erawan is a group of 7-tiered waterfalls and from what I've seen in pictures, absolutely breathtaking. More travel and more news to come! Now back to those books...

Posted by jenfeen 23:42 Archived in Thailand Comments (0)

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